INJURY PREVENTION

Health Evidence Bulletins - Wales
Team Leader : Dr. Ronan Lyons

Date of Completion: 02.04.98

4:Work Environment

This document is a supplement to, not a substitute for, professional skills and experience. Users are advised to consult the supporting evidence for a consideration of all the implications of a recommendation

The Statements The Evidence
4a. A logical deduction from the studies of alcohol and performance suggest that a reduction in blood-alcohol levels of persons operating equipment will result in fewer injuries at worki.
(Health Gain Notation-2 "likely to be beneficial")
i. Welsh Health Planning Forum. Protocol for Investment in Health Gain - Injuries. Cardiff: Welsh Office, June 1992.
(Type V evidence - expert opinion)
4b. Buildings must be designed for the maximum safety of their occupantsi
(Health Gain Notation-2 "likely to be beneficial")
i. Welsh Health Planning Forum. Protocol for Investment in Health Gain - Injuries. Cardiff: Welsh Office, June 1992.
(Type V evidence - expert opinion)
4c. Performance management techniques in the workplace reduce injuries. Performance management is a branch of behavioural science that can be used to address reasons workers return to dangerous practices despite training in safety practices i.
(Health Gain Notation -1 "beneficial")
i. Sulzer-Azaroff B, Todd CH, McCann KB. Beyond training: organizational performance management techniques. Occupational Medicine State of the Art Reviews 1994; 9: 321-329.
(Type I evidence - systematic review)
4d. There is no convincing evidence that training and education prevent low back injuries. There is very little evidence for a correct way to lift an objecti. A large-scale randomised controlled trial of an educational programme to prevent work associated low back injury found no long term benefits associated with trainingii. A review of back injury prevention programmes recommended further research iii.
(Health Gain Notation - 4 "unknown")
i. Hadler NM. Back pain in the workplace: what you lift or how far you lift matters far less than whether you lift or when. Spine 1997; 22: 935-940.
(Type IV evidence-observational study)
ii. Daltroy LH, Iverson MD, Larson MG. A controlled trial of an educational program to prevent low back injuries. New England Journal of Medicine 1997; 337: 322-328.
(Type II evidence - randomised controlled trial)
iii. Karas BE, Conrad KM. Back injury prevention interventions in the workplace: an integrative review. AAOHN Journal 1996; 44 (4): 189-196.
(Type I evidence- systematic review)

Top


Contents Home

Health Evidence Bulletins: Wales, Duthie Library, UWCM, Cardiff CF14 4XN. e-mail: weightmanal@cardiff.ac.uk